Other

Creating Inclusive PreK–12 STEM Learning Environments

Brief CoverBroadening participation in PreK–12 STEM provides ALL students with STEM learning experiences that can prepare them for civic life and the workforce.

Author/Presenter

Malcom Butler

Cory Buxton

Odis Johnson Jr.

Leanne Ketterlin-Geller

Catherine McCulloch

Natalie Nielsen

Arthur Powell

Year
2018
Short Description

This brief offers insights from National Science Foundation-supported research for education leaders and policymakers who are broadening participation in science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM). Many of these insights confirm knowledge that has been reported in research literature; however, some offer a different perspective on familiar challenges.

Theoretical Diversity and Inclusivity in Science and Environmental Education Research: A Way Forward

As distinct communities of practice (COP), science education research (SER) and environmental education research (EER) have both matured a great deal in recent decades, coming to include a greater diversity of theoretical perspectives, worldviews, and researcher and participant voices. In this paper, we present a view of theoretical inclusivity that promises a rich, robust research landscape for both EER and SER through the deliberate inclusion of non-Western theories.

Author/Presenter

Roberta Howard Hunter

Gail Richmond

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2022
Short Description

As distinct communities of practice (COP), science education research (SER) and environmental education research (EER) have both matured a great deal in recent decades, coming to include a greater diversity of theoretical perspectives, worldviews, and researcher and participant voices. In this paper, we present a view of theoretical inclusivity that promises a rich, robust research landscape for both EER and SER through the deliberate inclusion of non-Western theories.

Cultivating Epistemic Empathy in Preservice Teacher Education

This study investigates the emergence and cultivation of teachers' “epistemic empathy” in response to analyzing videos of student inquiry. We define epistemic empathy as the act of understanding and appreciating someone's cognitive and emotional experience within an epistemic activity—i.e., activity aimed at the construction, communication, and critique of knowledge.

Author/Presenter

Lama Jaber

Sherry Southerland

Felisha Drake

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2018
Short Description

This study investigates the emergence and cultivation of teachers' “epistemic empathy” in response to analyzing videos of student inquiry. We define epistemic empathy as the act of understanding and appreciating someone's cognitive and emotional experience within an epistemic activity—i.e., activity aimed at the construction, communication, and critique of knowledge. Our goals are (1) to conceptually develop the construct and contrast it to more general notions of caring and (2) to empirically examine epistemic empathy in the context of preservice teacher education. We discuss tensions in teachers' expressions of epistemic empathy, and we end with implications for research and practice.

“He Got a Glimpse of the Joys of Understanding” – The Role of Epistemic Empathy in Teacher Learning

Efforts to promote reform-based instruction have overlooked the import of affect in teacher learning. Drawing on prior work, I argue that teachers’ affective experiences in the discipline are integral to their learning how to teach the discipline. Moreover, I suggest that both affective and epistemological aspects of teachers’ experiences can serve to cultivate their epistemic empathy—the capacity for tuning into and valuing someone’s intellectual and emotional experience within an epistemic activity—in ways that support student-centered instruction.

Author/Presenter

Lama Jaber

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2021
Short Description

Efforts to promote reform-based instruction have overlooked the import of affect in teacher learning. Drawing on prior work, I argue that teachers’ affective experiences in the discipline are integral to their learning how to teach the discipline. Moreover, I suggest that both affective and epistemological aspects of teachers’ experiences can serve to cultivate their epistemic empathy—the capacity for tuning into and valuing someone’s intellectual and emotional experience within an epistemic activity—in ways that support student-centered instruction.

Research Toolkit

In Development! Stay tuned for more resources...

 

CADRE and the EQR Hub have compiled education research tips, resources and tools on research design, theory & frameworks, methodologies, instrumentation, human subjects, and data management.

Research Design 

Author/Presenter

The CADRE & EQR Teams

Year
2022
Short Description

Find education research tips, resources and tools.

Advancing Reasoning Covariationally (ARC) Curriculum

The Advancing Reasoning Covariationally (ARC) curriculum is a curriculum for working pre-service and in-service teachers. ARC targets and develops quantitative and covariational reasoning as connecting threads to major secondary mathematics ideas, particularly in the area of algebra, precalculus, and calculus.
Author/Presenter

The ARC Team

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2018
Short Description
The Advancing Reasoning Covariationally (ARC) curriculum is a curriculum for working pre-service and in-service teachers. ARC targets and develops quantitative and covariational reasoning as connecting threads to major secondary mathematics ideas, particularly in the area of algebra, precalculus, and calculus.

The Argumentation Toolkit

The Argumentation Toolkit is a collection of resources, including classroom videos, strategy guides and professional learning modules, designed to help teachers understand and teach scientific argumentation.

Author/Presenter

The Argument Toolkit Team

Year
2018
Short Description

The Argumentation Toolkit is a collection of resources, including classroom videos, strategy guides and professional learning modules, designed to help teachers understand and teach scientific argumentation.

The DiALoG Science Argumentation Tool

DiALoG stands for Diagnosing the Argumentation Levels of Groups. It is designed for teachers to formatively assess the quality of evidence-based arguments and to guide the selection of instructional responses designed to Improve the quality of students’ arguments. DiALoG assesses two important aspects of group argumentation – how well students construct their own evidence-based arguments (the INTRApersonal) and how well students are able to reconcile differences with others to co-construct meaning (the INTERpersonal).

Author/Presenter

The DiALoG Team

Year
2017
Short Description

DiALoG stands for Diagnosing the Argumentation Levels of Groups. It is designed for teachers to formatively assess the quality of evidence-based arguments and to guide the selection of instructional responses designed to Improve the quality of students’ arguments. DiALoG assesses two important aspects of group argumentation – how well students construct their own evidence-based arguments (the INTRApersonal) and how well students are able to reconcile differences with others to co-construct meaning (the INTERpersonal). The DiALoG system includes the DiALoG tool itself, along with the accompanying Responsive Mini Lessons (RMLs) and User Guides (UGs).

The DiALoG Science Argumentation Tool

DiALoG stands for Diagnosing the Argumentation Levels of Groups. It is designed for teachers to formatively assess the quality of evidence-based arguments and to guide the selection of instructional responses designed to Improve the quality of students’ arguments. DiALoG assesses two important aspects of group argumentation – how well students construct their own evidence-based arguments (the INTRApersonal) and how well students are able to reconcile differences with others to co-construct meaning (the INTERpersonal).

Author/Presenter

The DiALoG Team

Year
2017
Short Description

DiALoG stands for Diagnosing the Argumentation Levels of Groups. It is designed for teachers to formatively assess the quality of evidence-based arguments and to guide the selection of instructional responses designed to Improve the quality of students’ arguments. DiALoG assesses two important aspects of group argumentation – how well students construct their own evidence-based arguments (the INTRApersonal) and how well students are able to reconcile differences with others to co-construct meaning (the INTERpersonal). The DiALoG system includes the DiALoG tool itself, along with the accompanying Responsive Mini Lessons (RMLs) and User Guides (UGs).

LessonSketch Modules for Teaching Argumentation and Proving

What can you infer from this example? and Who is Right? are two modules that address issues of mathematical content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge for teaching reasoning and proving.Each module intends to help users strengthen their content knowledge related to logical aspects of proving.
Author/Presenter

Orly Buchbinder

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2020
Short Description

What can you infer from this example? and Who is Right? are two modules that address issues of mathematical content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge for teaching reasoning and proving.Each module intends to help users strengthen their content knowledge related to logical aspects of proving. It also addresses pedagogical aspects, such as students' conceptions of proving and pedagogical practices for supporting students' engagement with argumentation and proving.The modules can be used by prospective secondary teachers and by practicing teachers who seek to enhance their mathematical knowledge for teaching argumentation and proving.